Coming Out

Coming Out

I am right now 13. I tried to tell my parents I was bisexual but, they didn’t believe me. They didn’t care. They told me:
“There is only 2 genders, you are just confused, You don’t know what you want.” They tried to change me but… I didn’t listen. Still to this day they bug me about calling myself bisexual. I want to be a boy but sadly. I’m a girl. I don’t care what anyone else says, I am me. In school I get teased about it.

CONSIDER THIS:

  • It can be very disheartening when you have strong feelings about who you are but your parents do not take you seriously.  You feel that you are bisexual and you want your parents to accept you for who you are right now.  Unfortunately they don’t and having people tease you in school can make life even harder.
  • You deserve some support and acceptance for who you are.  Right now, your parents don’t accept that you consider yourself bisexual.  Please do not give up on them.  You are their daughter and they love you.  Consider how you can talk to them about how you are feeling and explain that you would like their support.  They may not understand or agree with you, but that does not mean that you do not deserve their support.  Consider finding a time to sit down and ask for their help with the teasing at school.
  • You are just entering your teens and starting to develop into the young adult you will become.  You are seeking to figure out who you are and you believe that part of who you are is bisexual.  It’s great that you feel certain enough not to care what people think.  However, please don’t stop trying to get the support and acceptance of your family.  The should help you deal with the hurtful words from other teens at school.  Everyone deserves to be treated with respect and dignity.  Consider how you might be able to get help at school, from a teacher or someone in the administration.  You should not have to endure teasing at school where every teen should have a safe learning environment.  Think about speaking to an adult at school about the teasing.
  • You may want to check out the LGBTQ resources on TeenCentral.com. Go to Learn and then click on Sexuality. This will give you more information on LGBTQ definitions and provide information that you can share with your parents.
  • Finally, talking with people about how you are feeling can help.  Sharing your story on TeenCentral.net is a good place to start.  Please continue to share your story on this site and also to read the stories of other teens who may have had similar experiences.  Also, do some research to see if there are support groups for bisexual teens in your area.  You may find some other teens in your community who you can share your thoughts and feelings with.  Stay strong and keep remembering that you deserve to be happy and have the right to be who you are.

HELP YOURSELF:

  • If your parents were sitting in front of you right now and you told them that you would like them to support you by accepting who you are and also help you stop the teasing at school what do you think they would say?
  • Who are some of the adult at school that you might be able to go to about the teasing?
  • What are some groups that provide support and guidance to bisexual teens that you might contact?